lanadelgayest:

It is 2014 stop this

acebunnie:

meeting people who like anime is either very good or very bad. 

theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK
Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.
"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK

  1. Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
  2. Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
  3. Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
  4. If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
  5. Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
  6. If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.

"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

urrplang:

colibooli:

almyro:

chinkerbelle:

Reasons I grab my boobs

  • running upstairs
  • running downstairs
  • running
  • stoked on life
  • scared
  • walking through my house in the dark
  • bored
  • boobs

do girls really do this?

yes. yes they do. 

it’s the best

newfoundlandfolkways:

Root Cellars

A root cellar is an underground or partially underground structure that is used to preserve vegetables and protect them from frost through the winter. Generally, they are constructed by digging a hole in the earth and reinforcing with wood, rock, cement, and/or other material before covering with sod, leaving a small door for access.

The cellar interior is divided into compartments called pounds, used to store different varieties of vegetables. Potatoes and turnips are stored in pounds directly on the ground, on raised wood, or in bins, while carrots and parsnips are stored in sand or sawdust to keep firm and moist. Cabbage, when stored in the cellar, is most often hung from above. Filled at harvest in the fall the cellar would be accessed every week or two, often a chore assigned to children, to bring in vegetables to the house as needed.

In Newfoundland and Labrador, root cellars were commonly used until the 1970s when electric refrigeration became more widely available. Today, hundreds – if not thousands – of root cellars can still be found throughout the island. While many are varying states of collapse and decay, others have been maintained and used continuously for multiple generations, and a growing number are being restored or built anew.

Contributed by Crystal Braye (with photos by L. Wilson)

birdsquirrel:

"ur a giant fuckin dork" I say, trying to convey my great esteem and admiration for you as best I know how.

babyferaligator:

U r beautiful and ur gonna do great today

babyferaligator:

U r beautiful and ur gonna do great today

Happy 80th Birthday, dear Jeremy!

Jeremy Brett (1933 - 1995) in ‘My Fair Lady’ (1964)

myotpisgay:

mycaterpie:

eduardo-:

losertakesall:

anglepoiselamp:

Most marine mammals are very flexible because they are made of 99% blorp.

Blorp.

Science. 

what the fuck is the last 1%

1% squish

myotpisgay:

mycaterpie:

eduardo-:

losertakesall:

anglepoiselamp:

Most marine mammals are very flexible because they are made of 99% blorp.

Blorp.

Science.

what the fuck is the last 1%

1% squish

thewicked-eternity